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karakul sheep characteristics

karakul sheep characteristics

Sheep, ( Ovis aries ), species of domesticated ruminant (cud-chewing) mammal, raised for its meat, milk, and wool. This is partially due to its multiple uses: fur, fleece, and meat, along with the qualities of hardiness and adaptability. Some archaeological evidence points to Karakul sheep being raised there continuously since 1400 BC. They are hardy and adaptable, thriving under rugged conditions in a variety of climates. animal-science-mail-form The Karakul sheep are medium-sized animals. Fetal karakul lambs are harvested through miscarriages, induced early delivery or by killing the mother sheep and removing the fetus. The exclusive combination of Persian lamb birth coat, a broadtail, refined ‘desert spirit’ head, and unique topline defines and separates the Karakul from other sheep breeds. The colour of the Karakul sheep is mainly black or grey. 301.8(b) Characteristics. The sheep is usually stockier than its relative the goat (genus Capra ); its horns, when present, are more divergent; it has scent glands in its face and hind feet; and the males lack the beards of goats. PO Box 477, 33 Hillsboro St, Pittsboro, NC 27312, College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, College of Human & Environmental Sciences, Ag Education, Communications & Leadership, Master of International Agriculture Degree Program. and carvings of a distinct Karakul type have been found on ancient Babylonian temples. [6] The pelts have also been used in haute couture. The Karakul (or Qaraqul) sheep was once deemed Namibia's 'black diamond'. Very few animals were obtained. Other colors include a wide range of shades; silver blues grays, golden tans, reddish browns, white with flecks of other colors include a wide range of shades; silver blues, grays, golden tans, reddish browns, white with flecks of other colors and occasionally pure white. Karakuls were introduced.to the U.S. between 1908 and 1929 for pelt production. Body and fleece types vary even in those Karakuls capable of producing lambs of high quality fur. The ewes are very protective and attentive mothers, resulting in a high lamb survival rate. The Karakul is considered a rare breed in the U.S. and most likely will remain so; current population is estimated at 1300 animals. Karakul are also raised in large numbers in Namibia, having first been brought there by German colonists in the early 20th century. They are resistant to internal parasites and foot rot. As a fat-tailed breed, they have a distinctive meat. The best have a fleece as glossy as their lamb coat. The Karakul sheep is believed to be one of the oldest domesticated sheep breed in the world and originates from Bukhara region in Uzbekistan, Central Asia (Bravenboer, 2007). It has a dominant black gene, so a very high percentage of these sheep are born black. Characteristics of the breed are a compact body with a straight back and slightly pendulous belly which is covered with wool. Many adults have a double coat, a fine down undercoat, covered by a coat of guard hair. Karakul Sheep Characteristics. The shoulders are straight and fleshy. characteristics. Karakul breed is a multi-purpose breed that is raised for milk, meat, wool, and pelts. Considered long-stapled (average 6" to 12" per year), the fleece lacks a high grease content. This lack of uniformity is apparent. Wattles are not unusual. The Karakuls posses a strong flocking instinct and can be run either on open range or in fenced pastures.